Sacramento Region, CA (MPG) -The latest quarterly survey of Sacramento regional employers has discovered that ‘helicopter parenting’ is apparently landing at work. Polling employers regularly since 1992 it appears a new trend may be emerging in workplaces involving ‘parental hovering’.  HR contacts surveyed say they are hearing more often now from parents than in past years.

Contact by a parent on behalf of an applicant or employee was noted by twelve percent (12%) of service firms, two percent (2%)of manufacturers, six percent (6%) of construction companies and five percent (5%) of retail employers polled directly by phone between May 22 and June 22, 2017. Pacific Staffing learned one quarter, or twenty-five percent (25%) of all companies reported having had this experience recently when asked about it directly. This is an unwelcome new trend and seems to be growing in the workplace.

In anecdotal comments, the people who hire and manage people suggest they don’t want to hear from parents in any way. Comments described personal contact by a parent as ‘meddling’, an ‘embarrassment for parent and child’, ‘not appropriate’ and whether positive or negative unwelcome as an ‘intrusion’ that raised ‘privacy issues’ and often resulted in an unfavorable view of that individual as an applicant, or as an employee.

One HR contact says they were surprised when a parent called to say they fired their child without taking time to really ‘understand’ them. The response was ‘just need them to do the job, not understand them’.  Another described a parent who called to say they should not rescind a job offer as a parking valet, but couldn’t dispute the decision when they learned the individual was let go when they could not drive a stick shift. A fact not revealed in the interview or to the parent.                           

With seventy-two percent (72%) of employers in the Sacramento region hiring in the next three months, new challenges are emerging. They include finding qualified applicants, including a wide variety of IT positions, construction equipment operators and skilled trades, sales, customer service and adequate numbers of entry level people. HR contacts also report retention of current workers and growing wage pressure from the thin talent pool as issues in Q3. Nineteen percent (19%) of hiring was motivated by seasonal needs in July, August and September.

For more information, employment blogs and market surveys go to www.pacificstaffing.com.


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Funding notice encourages local applicants to use Housing First approach

Washington, D.C. (MPG) - In an effort to prevent and effectively end homelessness, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is making $2 billion available to support thousands of local homeless assistance programs nationwide. Funded through the Continuum of Care (CoC) Homeless Assistance ProgramHUD’s funding notice continues to encourage local applicants to use a Housing First approach to help individuals and families move quickly into permanent housing.  Read HUD’s Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA).

HUD’s Continuum of Care homeless assistance grants support a wide variety of local programs from street outreach and assessment programs to transitional and permanent housing for individuals, including, veterans, youth, families, and persons experiencing long-term or chronic homelessness.

“We know these grants can make a huge difference in ending homelessness” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson.  “HUD continues to forge deep relationships with our local partners to invest in proven programs that are working to reduce the scale of homelessness in their communities.”

HUD continues to place a major emphasis on ending homelessness for all persons experiencing homelessness, creating a systematic response to homelessness and improving how resources are used to end homelessness. These priorities will make it much more competitive and increase incentives for communities to improve their performance. As part of these priorities, HUD is continuing incentives to adopt best practices for rapid-rehousing and Housing First, an approach that has proven effective in helping communities to make progress on their goal of ending homelessness.

Additionally, HUD is encouraging communities to end veteran, chronic, family, and youth homelessness and to use their data to strategically target their available resources to end homelessness. Finally, to help communities reach these goals, there is greater flexibility provided to create a variety of new projects that will allow recipients to serve different populations of individuals and families experiencing homelessness as well as to support increased data collection and analysis.

HUD requires prospective grantees to submit applications electronically at www.grants.gov. Any changes to HUD-published funding notices will be made available to the public through a Federal Register publication and published on this government-wide portal. Applicants are urged to sign up for Grants.gov’s notification service to receive periodic updates or changes to these grant offerings.  The application deadline is September 28, 2017. 

HUD's mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all. More information about HUD and its programs is available on the Internet at www.hud.gov 

Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development,

Office of Public Affairs, Washington, DC 20410            


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Senator Gaines Calls Cap-and-Trade Deal a Massive energy Tax 

Sacramento, CA (MPG) Senator Ted Gaines (R-El Dorado) on July 13th, voted against Assembly Bills 398 and 617 during a Senate Committee on Environmental Quality hearing. These bills are the Governor and Legislative Democrats’ attempt to extend California’s cap-and-trade program.

“Cap-and-trade is bait and switch.

“Governor Brown is full of talk about cap-and-trade ‘benefits’ we never verify and jobs we never see. What we do see are electricity rates that are 50-percent higher than the national average and a million California households living in energy poverty and struggling to get by because we push power prices up beyond affordability.

“California just passed a new gas tax that will add twelve cents to the cost of every gallon of gasoline starting this fall. This cap-and-trade extension could add about another seventy-three cents a gallon on top of that. While the rest of the country is paying $2 a gallon for gas, we are going to be paying a dollar and a half a gallon just in taxes and climate fees!

“Governor Brown and his cadre of climate change extremists won’t be happy until California leads the nation in wind, solar and poverty. 

“This so-called historic agreement is really just a big fat energy tax. Californians will have to use less but pay more for it. That is a rotten deal for our families and businesses.”

Senator Ted Gaines represents the 1st Senate District, which includes all or parts of Alpine, El Dorado, Lassen, Modoc, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Shasta, Sierra and Siskiyou counties.


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Sacramento Region, CA (MPG) - New data released by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) show an increase in newly reported hepatitis C cases among young adults in the state. Between 2007 and 2015, newly reported hepatitis C infections increased 55 percent among men 20-29 years of age and 37 percent among women in the same age group.

These data are consistent with increases in hepatitis C across the country and highlight the importance of hepatitis C testing, treatment, and prevention. Injection drug use among young adults increases their risk of both hepatitis C transmission and infection. Prevention strategies, including access to sterile syringes and safe injection equipment and treatment for opioid use disorders, can reduce the rate of new hepatitis C infections among young people who inject drugs by 60 percent.

“As a physician, I have seen firsthand the deadly effects of hepatitis C,” said CDPH Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith. “Patients with advanced liver disease may not know they are infected until it’s too late,” said Dr. Smith. “However, this is preventable. New treatments can cure hepatitis C in as little as two months. I urge people to speak with their doctors about getting tested.”

An estimated 400,000 Californians live with chronic hepatitis C, but many do not know they are infected. Hepatitis C-related deaths now outnumber those due to HIV.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the use of new treatment for adolescents 12 years and older, raising hopes for teenagers infected with hepatitis C. Although young Californians (ages 20-29) make up an increasing number of newly reported infections, baby boomers account for about one out of two newly reported chronic hepatitis C cases.

“Two groups are top priority for hepatitis C testing – young people who inject drugs and baby boomers,” said Dr. Smith. “Drug users may be at high risk for transmitting hepatitis C to others if they are not being treated, and baby boomers may be at risk for developing serious liver disease, even if they have no symptoms.”

CDPH urges all Californians who have ever injected drugs, even once, and all people born between 1945 and 1965 to talk to their doctors about getting tested for hepatitis C. Patients who test positive should receive care from an experienced provider.

The Department is working to address hepatitis C on multiple fronts, including monitoring hepatitis C trends, producing data reports, educating health care providers on hepatitis C screening and treatment guidelines, and supporting hepatitis C testing and access to care in settings where at-risk people are served. CDPH also supports coordinated HIV and hepatitis C testing in non-traditional settings, such as mobile health vans. In 2016, about 7,200 people received hepatitis C testing through these programs.

The California Legislature allocated $2.2 million in July 2015 for three-year pilot projects to help ensure people with hepatitis C are aware of their infections and linked to care. 

For more information about viral hepatitis prevention in California, visit the CDPH Office of Viral Hepatitis Prevention webpage at www.cdph.ca.gov


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California WaterFix Receives Authorization under the U.S. Endangered Species Act

Sacramento, CA (MPG) - Federal agencies responsible for the protection of species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) today provided biological opinions on the proposed construction and operation of California WaterFix. These biological opinions allow WaterFix to continue moving toward construction as early as 2018. This important project is designed to ensure a reliable water source for 25 million Californians while affording environmental protections for multiple species that depend upon the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

“We are poised to take action to better protect our state water supplies and native fisheries,” said California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird.  “After 10 years of study, analysis, dialogue and scientific inquiry, we have come to a shared vision—and feasible approach—for how best to meet the co-equal goals of providing a more reliable water supply for California and protecting, restoring and enhancing the Delta ecosystem.”

The proposed project includes new water intakes on the Sacramento River near Hood and dual 35-mile-long tunnels to carry water to the existing south Delta pumping plants for the State Water Project (SWP) and Central Valley Project (CVP). Both biological opinions found the construction and operations of WaterFix as proposed would not jeopardize the continued existence of ESA-listed species or destroy or adversely modify critical habitat for those species.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) implement the ESA, with NOAA Fisheries primarily responsible for marine species and the Service for land and freshwater species. Under the ESA, other federal agencies must consult with the Service and NOAA when their activities have the potential to impact federally endangered or threatened species.

The biological opinions analyze the effects to ESA-listed species, including the threatened Delta smelt, endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon, threatened spring-run Chinook salmon, threatened North American green sturgeon, threatened California Central Valley steelhead and endangered Southern Resident Killer Whales, which depend heavily on Chinook salmon for food.

The biological opinions recognize the uncertainty inherent in the dynamic ecology of the Delta and include a strong adaptive management component, where research, monitoring, and real-time tracking of fish populations and other factors will guide future operation of the new intakes.

“The wisest thing to do in the face of uncertainty is to monitor constantly, test hypotheses regularly, adjust operations accordingly, and reassess,” said California Department of Water Resources (DWR) Acting Director Bill Croyle. “In the Delta, we always will be adjusting to improve resiliency and protect the environment. What won’t change is our compliance with the state and federal Endangered Species Acts.”

DWR owns and operates the SWP. The 29 public agencies contracting to receive SWP water serve more than 25 million Californians and nearly a million acres of irrigated agricultural land.

The biological opinions are important components of the analysis of the environmental effects of WaterFix. The Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) released in December 2016 include measures to avoid or minimize impacts that could arise from the proposed project.

Once the EIR has been certified through completion of the California Environmental Quality Act process, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will be able to consider whether to issue an “incidental take” permit for the construction and operation of WaterFix under the California Endangered Species Act.

These biological opinions will also be considered by permitting agencies, including the State Water Resources Control Board in its hearing now underway on a petition by DWR and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to allow for the change in points of diversion to add three new intakes on the Sacramento River as part of WaterFix. WaterFix would not change the volume of water to which the SWP and CVP are entitled to divert, but would add additional diversion points in a more environmentally protective place that also is easier to safeguard against natural disaster such as earthquake and sea-level rise due to climate change.

Source: DWR


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Placer County, CA (MPG) - According to the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), an invasive insect known as the Asian Citrus Psyllid has been found in Roseville. Asian Citrus Psyllid, or ACP is a serious pest of citrus because it vectors a bacteria that is 100% fatal to citrus trees.

As a result of this detection, CDFA is placing a significant portion of the City of Roseville, as well as portions of Rocklin, Lincoln, North Highlands, Citrus Heights, and unincorporated Placer County under quarantine.  This quarantine will mean that residents and businesses (primarily plant nurseries) will be prohibited from moving or selling citrus plant material including stems and leaves from within the quarantine boundaries.

For more information about citrus pest and disease prevention and to learn what to expect if state agriculture officials ask to access your property to inspect your citrus tree, visit http://www.californiacitrusthreat.org/   or call the CDFA Pest Hotline at 800-491-1899.  


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Placer County, CA (MPG) - Nearly six months since its collapse, Placer County is pleased to announce the completion of emergency repairs and official reopening of Morton Road with a bridge over Canyon Creek in Alta.

On Jan. 10, torrential rain caused 40 feet of rock and soil between the Canyon Creek culvert and Morton Road to be swept away several hundred yards downstream, stranding 15 households on the east side of the road. An alternative access was established, however it traversed a steep, windy gravel road over private property, causing alarm for emergency vehicle access.

The Placer County Board of Supervisors quickly approved two measures giving both short- and long-term assistance to the isolated community, so the county and RNR Construction could begin around-the-clock construction of a new bridge. With the bridge repair on the fast-track, the county was able to meet its goal of completion by the end of June.

A small ceremony was held on July 5th to celebrate the affected residents of Alta and give thanks to the men and women who worked so diligently to reconnect a community.

Source: Placer County

See video here: https://placercounty.app.box.com/s/71m2qr4uysa2dln3z1kriewqdrhc6b13/file/187711680977


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